Recent Posts

Pain Tool Kit from Fraser Health BC

Pain Tool Kit (11 MB pdf).

From Fraser Health, BC.

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Promoting Awareness of RSD and CRPS in Canada

The mission of PARC (Promoting Awareness of RSD and CRPS in Canada) is to support, educate and inform persons with Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), otherwise known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), the community and the medical professionals treating RSD, about the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. The suffering of persons with this disease must also be recognized.

Here 24/7 : Addictions, Mental Health & Crisis Services Waterloo-Wellington-Dufferin

If you or someone you know:

  • Doesn’t know where or how to get help
  • Feels hopeless
  • Withdraws from friends and family
  • Threatens to or talks about hurting or killing themselves or others
  • Increases alcohol or drug use
  • Engages in reckless behaviours
  • Is in need of support for addictions or mental health
  • Feels rage or uncontrolled anger
  • Sees no reason for living
  • Feels trapped, like there is no way out
  • Has dramatic mood changes
  • Feels anxious, agitated or unable to sleep

Call anytime to access:
1 844 437 3247
1 844 Here247

TTY: 1-877-688-5501

Here 24/7 is your front door to the addictions, mental health and crisis services provided by 12 agencies across Waterloo – Wellington – Dufferin. All you need to do is reach out to us. We do the intake, assessment, referral, crisis, waitlist and appointment booking work for these important programs. It’s our job to be your guide, figure out your needs and help you navigate the system. This leaves you free to focus on maintaining hope and pursuing recovery.

If you have any concerns, we hope you’ll get in touch.
We’re Here 24/7

Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington Dufferin

The Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington Dufferin (CMHA WWD) provides a full care system for those with addictions, mental health or developmental needs. We serve everyone from children to adults to seniors, all under one roof. Our programs help individuals and families to lead lives filled with meaning and promise. We have 350 staff at offices in Cambridge, Waterloo, Kitchener, Guelph, Fergus, Orangeville, and Mount Forest. We also provide visiting/satellite services in Arthur, Shelburne, Erin and Palmerston.

What is Cannabis (Marijuana, Hashish)

Street names: marijuana (grass, weed, pot, dope, ganja and others), hashish (hash), hash oil (weed oil, honey oil)

Cannabis sativa, also known as the hemp plant, has been cultivated for centuries for industrial and medical use, and for its “psychoactive,” or mind-altering, effects. Marijuana, hashish and hashish oil all derive from the cannabis plant.

More than 61 chemicals, called cannabinoids, have been identified as specific to the cannabis plant. THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) is the main psychoactive cannabinoid, and is most responsible for the “high” associated with marijuana use.

Click here to read more from the CAMH website.

What are opioids?

Street names: M, morph, (for morphine); meth (for methadone); percs (for Percodan, Percocet); juice (for Dilaudid); oxy, OC, hillbilly heroin (for OxyContin).

Opioids are a family of drugs that have morphine-like effects. The primary medical use for prescription opioids is to relieve pain. Other medical uses include control of coughs and diarrhea, and the treatment of addiction to other opioids. Opioids can also produce euphoria, making them prone to abuse. Some people use opioids for their ability to produce a mellow, relaxed “high.”

Federal laws regulate the possession and distribution of all opioids. Use of prescription opioids is legal only when they are prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner, and are used by the person to whom they are prescribed. Illegal use includes “double doctoring,” or obtaining a prescription from more than one doctor without telling the prescribing doctor about other prescriptions received in the past 30 days. Penalties for the illegal possession and distribution of prescription opioids include fines, imprisonment or both.

Where do opioids come from?

Some opioids, such as morphine and codeine, occur naturally in opium, a gummy substance collected from the seed pod of the opium poppy, which grows in southern Asia. Semi-synthetic opioids, such as oxycodone (e.g., OxyContin), hydromorphone (e.g., Dilaudid) or hydrocodone (e.g., Tussionex) are made by changing the chemical structure of naturally occurring opioids. Synthetic opioids, such as methadone, meperidine (e.g., Demerol) and fentanyl (Duragesic Patch), are made from chemicals without using a naturally occurring opioid as a starting material.

Click here to read more from the CAMH website.

Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids

The purpose of the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids (CCIC) is to advance our understanding of the role of cannabinoids in health and disease through research and education.

The CCIC is a federally registered Canadian nonprofit organization of basic and clinical researchers and health care professionals established to promote evidence-based research and education concerning the endocannabinoid system and therapeutic applications of endocannabinoid and cannabinoid agents.

We will do this by:

Educating: Researchers, health care practitioners and the public about the endocannabinoid system and possible roles of cannabinoids in clinical practice;

Facilitating: Research regarding the endocannabinoid system, mechanisms of action and clinical safety and efficacy of cannabinoids;

Creating: A networking forum for researchers investigating endocannabinoids and cannabinoids;

Advancing: Our understanding of the role of endocannabinoids and cannabinoids in health and disease.